NASA’s Unprecedented Melt Has Happened 65 Times In The Last 10,000 Years

melt events have occurred at Summit in the past and I have quoted the longest-term average frequency of ~150 years (exactly 153 from the paper) over the past 10,000

‘Unprecedented’ Greenland Surface Melt – Every 150 Years? – NYTimes.com

The unprecedented melt has happened 65 times in the last 10,000 years. But it is worse than it seems. If there was any significant melting, the albedo of the ice surface would have dropped off visibly and dramatically.  It didn’t change at all.

Every skier can tell the difference between fresh unmelted snow and melting snow. Fresh snow is very bright – and you need sunglasses. Melting snow is much darker. The snow on top of most of the ice sheet shows no sign of melt.

Look how much brighter the snow on Greenland is, than the sea ice to the north.

//ARCTIC.IO/OBSERVATIONS/8/2012-07-23/6-N70.834481-W51.244621

About these ads

About stevengoddard

Just having fun
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to NASA’s Unprecedented Melt Has Happened 65 Times In The Last 10,000 Years

  1. Andy DC says:

    Does not look like icecap will be gone anytime soon.

  2. MFKBoulder says:

    Funny how you discuss albedo of the ice whil psoting a picture wher most of the ice is obsured by clouds. And again you actually do not see ice at the surface in the elevated parts of Greenland,
    That’s nor even firn up there. It is last winters snow. And this was melting at the SURFACE.
    Something that you often enough dienied.
    Reading your posts this tune pop up into my mind:

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s