Saskatchewan Breaking All Snowfall Records

With a little under a month to go before the “official” start of winter, the city of Regina, Saskatchewan, has already broken records for its snowiest November.
At a few days shy of December, the city has received between 55 and 70 cm of snow for the entire month of November, depending on the location.
That’s more than the 1941 November record of 53 cm. The historical average for November is around 14 cm.
“It’s roughly half of what Regina gets the whole winter,” Weather Network meteorologist Mark Robinson says
This is the exact opposite of what the IPCC forecazst

2001 15.2.4.1.2.4. Ice Storms

Milder winter temperatures will decrease heavy snowstorms

http://observatory.ph/resources/IPCC/TAR/wg2/569.htm#1524123

IPCC Draft 1995

shrinking snow cover in winter

http://www.nytimes.com/

h/t to LLAP
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5 Responses to Saskatchewan Breaking All Snowfall Records

  1. Pshaw. 2001. 1995. We’ve moved on! Pay no attention to what we said in the irrelevant past! Listen to us now!

    Until later. What that’s wrong, too. Then we’ll have new predictions that will be more truthy, and you should totally pay attention to those.

    For a while.

  2. Lance says:

    we have had a series of very heavy snow events in southern alberta, sask, this month….and yes, these areas ‘normallly’ don’t get very big snowfalls…at least until the spring time…

  3. leftinbrooklyn says:

    The Warmist’s Almanac must be in development. The end all reference for all things climate-perfection. Exactly how much heat, how much cold, how much snow, how much rain is the perfect amount for this planet, everytime, everywhere. And when conditions are not in that perfect state, too much or too little (which will be always), people did something bad.

  4. Andy DC says:

    Climate science has become far more sophisticated over the last several years. We used to think that warming simply made it warmer, with less snow. Now, today’s advanced computer models and peer reviewed climate research tell us that warming can also make it colder and snowier.

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