The Past Decade Had The Snowiest Winters On Record

According to Rutgers University Global Snow Lab, the past decade had the snowiest winters on record.

Winter temperatures have been plummeting, and we are seeing record amounts of snow. This is not due to global warming and it is time for the climate science community to start being honest with themselves.

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32 Responses to The Past Decade Had The Snowiest Winters On Record

  1. Amino Acids in Meteorites says:

    Well, we’re told it really is due to warming. A warmer earth equals a snowier earth. Didn’t you know? They insist on it. Also, the extent the snow reaches is larger from warming. If it keeps warming there’ll be snow all the way down to the equator in winter. That’s how you know the earth is getting warmer. A hot earth means a snow covered earth. It should be in all the texts books.

    ;o)

  2. AndyW says:

    But how much is snowfall due to temperature? Surely it is more dependent on the amount of moisture in the air?

    Andy

    • If you bothered to read all three sentences in the article you would know that winter temperatures have also been plummeting at an historic rate.

    • Amino Acids in Meteorites says:

      Surely it is more dependent on the amount of moisture in the air?

      Clouds and precipitation have a negative feedback.

    • Amino Acids in Meteorites says:

      AndyW says:
      November 10, 2010 at 5:40 am

      But how much is snowfall due to temperature? Surely it is more dependent on the amount of moisture in the air?

      Why don’t you tell us Andy since you global warmers are expert in all things weather.

      You know, you should start your own weather channel. Certainly you’ll get all your forecasts right.

      • AndyW says:

        I asked Steve a question as he made the link, I didn’t put up the two factors.

        Andy

      • Amino Acids in Meteorites says:

        Ok, so you were think that snow is not due to temperature or moisture? What point were you trying to make? It certainly isn’t clear.

      • Amino Acids in Meteorites says:

        AndyW says:
        November 10, 2010 at 5:40 am

        But how much is snowfall due to temperature? Surely it is more dependent on the amount of moisture in the air?

        I know you’re trying to prove manmade co2 in some way by saying this. But it looks like there is no point that makes sense in it.

    • Amino Acids in Meteorites says:

      AndyW says:
      November 10, 2010 at 5:40 am

      But how much is snowfall due to temperature?

      I have to keep pointing this out to you and your crowd: the graph is not about amount of snow but about the area covered by snow. You guys go on and on about the amount of snow, and how it’s supposed to be increasing because warming is causing more evaporation which will cause more precipitation, blah, blah, blah. Your global warming hypothesis says more snow will fall in a smaller and smaller area heading toward the pole as the years go by. But, instead, in the real world snow is falling on a larger and larger area heading toward the equator—because the world has been cooling since 1998. Areas farther south are getting snow where rain had fallen in the past. So a larger area of the NH is covered in snow at winter. So please talk about a larger area heading toward the equator being covered by snow in the NH when you see this graph from now on.

      But you all say it’s snowing more because the earth is warming. Heck, if this keeps up snow will reach past the equator—all because it’s getting so hot! ;o)

      OK, so how about you start talking about what the graph is showing because it is clear you guys don’t even know what that is. This is just more evidence that global warmers don’t know what they’re doing. Graphs are foreign to you folk. It’s like that for you because after all, who needs graphs when you have computer models.

      • AndyW says:

        Amino said

        “I have to keep pointing this out to you and your crowd: the graph is not about amount of snow but about the area covered by snow. You guys go on and on about the amount of snow”

        I haven’t said anything about the graph or amount of snow, Steve did. I asked whether snow was more connected to amount of moisture than temps.

        If you haven’t got anything worthwhile to say don’t feel obliged to post.

        Andy

      • Amino Acids in Meteorites says:

        I asked whether snow was more connected to amount of moisture than temps.

        Why aren’t both h2o in the air and temperature both important? Are you sure it is me that is making unworthwhile posts?

      • Mike Davis says:

        AndyW:
        It seems the moisture in the atmosphere is doing what it always does, but with cold air systems coming further south during the winter more of the Northern Hemisphere is getting snow because what would have been rain is now snow.
        That phenomena was also observed in the Southern Hemisphere recently during their winter a few months ago.

    • slp says:

      I would say snow is more dependent on temperature than moisture. It does not matter how much moisture is in the air if the temperature does not drop below freezing. For example, I have lived in Florida all of my life, and as anyone who has ever visited knows, we have no lack of moisture yet it does not snow except on the extremely rare occasion that the temperature drops very low (yes, 32F is very low). At the same time, Colorado, where I have visited a relative a few times (and I believe where Mr. Goddard resides) gets a lot of snow and it is quite dry there.

      • Amino Acids in Meteorites says:

        slp says:
        November 10, 2010 at 12:03 pm

        I would say snow is more dependent on temperature than moisture.

        AndyW is playing some sort of 20-questions -on-words game about moisture in the air to try to prove that warmer temperatures make for more evaporation of h2o and so there will be more snow. But the graph is not showing snow falling in greater amounts in a smaller area—which is what the “manmade global warming” hypothesis claims. The graph shows snow covering a larger area of the Northern Hemisphere. That will not happen in “global warming” hypothesis—it could not possibly happen in a warming world, but I’m sure some labored reasoning will say it could. AndyW he doesn’t know that. He is just talking and talking about things he thinks are important to proving manmade global warming—more moisture in the air, more snow, more moisture in the air, more snow, more moisture in the air, more snow.

        But then he’ll say he’s just quoting Steven Goddard, nothing else. I’m sure he has no ulterior motive in quoting him. He’s just quoting him for no reason in particular, nothing in mind, just randomly biding some time here.

  3. AndyW says:

    I did read it. That ‘s why I wrote, ” But how much is snowfall due to temperature? Surely it is more dependent on the amount of moisture in the air? ”

    ie is temp decrease the main driver for snowfall? In the UK for instance the coldest temps are normally when we get Northerly winds and high pressure making clear nights, but heavy snowfall often occurs when we get warmer low weather systems stuck over the UK, perhaps buffering up again very cold European highs.

    You do this all the time, link two things with no proof. Like you linked number of hurricanes hitting the USA with amount of CO2 in the air.

    Andy

    • Proof? Think about that concept carefully before using it in context of AGW.

    • Amino Acids in Meteorites says:

      link two things with no proof. Like you linked number of hurricanes hitting the USA with amount of CO2 in the air.

      You’re right Andy, the amount of co2 has nothing to do with hurricanes—- oh wait, you meant hitting the USA. Or did you mean the amount or hurricanes? Or did you mean the intensity of hurricanes? Or did you mean co2 causing hurricanes. Or did you mean the amount of severe weather around the world? Who can know since the bar keeps moving all the time.

      • AndyW says:

        That’s another question for Steve not me, he was the one who posted up a CO2 figure in connection with number of hurricanes hitting the USA, then didn’t say why he did this.

        Why do you keep asking me to defend what Steve is posting?

        Andy

    • Paul H says:

      Andy

      Last winter here in the UK we had the coldest winter for some years with most of the country snow covered for several weeks – this was no coincidence.

      You are quite right that we often get heavy snowfalls when moist Atlantic hits cold air coming off the continent. Usually however the milder Atlantic air quickly melts the snow on the ground, often turning to rain.

      • AndyW says:

        Very true.

        Andy

      • Amino Acids in Meteorites says:

        What AndyW is having trouble with is the graph has nothing to do with a large amount of snow falling in a particular location like the UK. The graph shows record snowcover–meaning snow is covering a larger area—not deeper snow in a smaller area—which is what he and other global warmers think the graph is showing. The taller bar must be making them think it means deeper snow.

        There could be deeper snow in most places, and probably could be true, since colder, longer winters would cause what would have been rain in warmer temperatures to be snow in colder temperatures.

        What is obvious is the graph is showing, in all likelihood, that the greater extent of snow is from colder temps, not warmer temps.

        And since the earth has been cooling since 1998 it would logically follow.

  4. ES says:

    1967 to 1970 is nor a decade!

  5. ES says:

    Amino Acids in Meteorites says:
    November 10, 2010 at 7:58 am
    Ok, and………?

    The title of the story was:
    The Past Decade Had The Snowiest Winters On Record
    If you had the snowfall from 1961 to 1970, it would more than likely be more than the last ten. As it is, the snowfall for those three years is nearly the same as the last ten.

    • Alexej Buergin says:

      “If you had the snowfall from 1961 to 1970, it would more than likely be more than the last ten. As it is, the snowfall for those three years is nearly the same as the last ten.”

      That depends on wether the numbers are a sum or an average.
      The table of Rutgers has no labels, but it looks like the latter to me.

      • Paul H says:

        They are definitely averages.

      • Amino Acids in Meteorites says:

        Alexej Buergin says:
        November 10, 2010 at 9:53 am

        That depends

        These guys are straining to find a way to explain why global warming is still happening even though we can see nature showing us cooling is happening. They have an uphill battle, and for me, it is a lesson in foolish side of human nature to watch them continue to push “global warming” up that hill.

    • sunsettommy says:

      The data starts in November 1966.

    • Amino Acids in Meteorites says:

      Ok, then what about the other completed decades of snow? It seems trivial to point out the time frame you did.

    • Amino Acids in Meteorites says:

      ES says:
      November 10, 2010 at 8:31 am

      it would more than likely be more than the last ten.

      Explain why you say likely, please.

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