1936 : Severe Drought, Disastrous Floods In US

http://trove.nla.gov.au/

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5 Responses to 1936 : Severe Drought, Disastrous Floods In US

  1. Paul H says:

    The Medina River in Texas was no stranger to droughtfloods.

    “The river and the lake suffered through record dry periods in the 1930s and the 1950s, which were followed by the usual floods. On August 2, 1978, what was widely termed a 500-year flood came
    down the Medina, an unofficial record rainfall of forty-eight inches having fallen on the North Prong in twenty-four-hours. Twenty-two lives were lost, millions of dollars of property loss or severe damage reported, and thousands of cypress and pecan trees downed.”

    What was it Katherine Hayhoe was saying about once a century rainfall events?

    http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/rnm02

  2. Paul H says:

    Meanwhile in Sterling County-

    The drought of 1883 precipitated the fence-cutting wars, a particularly violent phase of this change in land use.

    3 years later-

    The arrival of homesteaders in Sterling County precipitated the breakup of some of the great free-range ranches; the drought of 1886–87, which bankrupted the Half Circle S, helped to hasten their demise.

    http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hcs15

  3. Paul H says:

    In Kermit, Texas –

    but in 1916 most of the newly-settled families fled the area, seeking relief from a sweltering drought.

  4. Paul H says:

    In Kermit, Texas –

    but in 1916 most of the newly-settled families fled the area, seeking relief from a sweltering drought.

    http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hfk02

  5. Paul H says:

    Santa Cruz had drought for 6 years!

    a large cross at the top of a hill above the community commemorates the rain that broke a drought that reportedly had lasted from 1888 until 1894. The site of the cross is known as Loma de la Cruz.

    http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hvs36

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