Southern Hemisphere Temperatures From “Òne Thermometer” Phil

Phil Jones was able to determine the 1850 southern hemisphere temperature to three digit precision, from a single thermometer in Tasmania. The graph above shows the complete time series since 1850 for Tasmania.

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About stevengoddard

Just having fun
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18 Responses to Southern Hemisphere Temperatures From “Òne Thermometer” Phil

  1. tckev says:

    Steven,
    You are name-checked again with reference to Arctic melting at
    http://notrickszone.com/2012/09/01/veteran-german-journalist-calls-claims-of-unprecendented-arctic-ice-melt-gross-nonsense/

    Your making a global impact!

  2. suyts says:

    Phil’s an amazing guys. He’s got a lot of talent!

  3. AlskaHoundish says:

    The hurricane central folks must admit their season is over.
    Check what happened to the SST’s from Africa right on over to our neck of the woods, over the past 2 days… Squalls and TD’s can happen below 79.713 degrees F, but not hurricanes.

  4. markstoval says:

    How long can these frauds continue with this crap? Do scientists in other fields not care that they are making a mockery of science? Do others not care that children are being taught that cheating with the data is an important part of the job as a scientist?

    • gator69 says:

      See ‘The Oregon Petition’. Most of the rest of scientists are too busy with their own microcosms to notice, or are afraid of being shunned by those who dole out your money.

  5. Sundance says:

    Looks like Phil (hide from the FOI) Jones, has found a way to take the “work” out of “guesswork”. I wonder if Hansen could measure Arctic temperatures using a thermometer in Tasmania. He’s a climate genius so probably he could. 🙂

  6. gator69 says:

    I bet Hansen could do it with half a thermometer!

    • Baa Humbug says:

      I’ll bet Jones can do it from the info in the diary of a shipmate in a clipper in 1770 who once licked his finger and stuck it up in the air 🙂

      • Hugh K says:

        It really doesn’t matter….as long as it is a team member – “It is better we (I mean all of us here) put the caveats in ourselves than let others put them in for us.” – Phil Jones

  7. samuel says:

    Phil Jones didn’t “determine the 1850 southern hemisphere temperature to three digit precision”. There’s a file for hadcrut3 giving the 95% uncertainty ranges. For August 1850 the 95% uncertainty covers -2.911C to 0.323C.

    A graph of this data is here:

    • Only a moron would publish three digit precision with an error bar 3000X higher. And only an even bigger moron would accept it.

      • Its not a statement of precision. Its an estimate that minimizes the error given the information available. And, of course there are many more measurements for 1850.

        That said, some idiots think you can look at one spot in greenland and understand the arctic

        • Steven, look up the definition of precision before you make stupid comments. Do you think there is another large ice sheet besides Greenland in the Arctic?

          I’ve lost all respect for you at this point.

  8. Looking at the data from Hobart it looks as if the temperature has gone up, down, up, down and no where at all in particular. Where’s that significant impact from all that logging up the Derwent Valley? Surely at this time in Sydney, founded sixty years earlier in 1788, and by year 1850, much bigger, someone had purchased a thermometer and was keeping records. Melbourne was founded in 1835 and perhaps someone came out there with one too? Basing temperatures of the southern hemisphere on Hobart makes little sense. It reminds me of all those dark red squares that keep getting filled in up in the arctic where there are no thermometers owing to severe cold and lack of interest.

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