The New Normal – Everything Is The Worst Ever

The gubermint tells us that Irene, Isaac and Sandy are the worst storms ever. The 2012 drought was the worst ever. 2012 is the hottest year ever.

These claims are all completely true, assuming that time began two years ago and you have the IQ of a turnip.

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10 Responses to The New Normal – Everything Is The Worst Ever

  1. Owen says:

    The ‘world is ending’ rant that accompanies every tempest in a teapot storm is insane. Anyone with an IQ above moron need not apply for a lamestream media position. You’ll never get hired.

  2. tckev says:

    Turnipist!

  3. Andy DC says:

    Sandy is unprecedented, the worst CAT .6 hurricane EVER. Even worse than Irene!

  4. Ira says:

    On behalf of the turnip, I resent that! (with apologies to Moe and Curley)

  5. Simple reasoning behind it all, for the AGW promoters: If they can’t get more of the MSM to declare outright that global warming causes extreme weather, their suggestion is to hype the weather more than normal in order to get joe-average dumb public to think it sure has gotten a lot worse. Combine this current “Sandy Franken-disaster (do NOT call it only a Cat 1 hurricane) with mentions of the Cat 9 mega-killer Irene from last year (which wiped out the entire NE coast and a significant portion of Canada), and that should do the trick.

  6. Mike Sidell of TWC is doing the obligatory, squat-lean-forward stance while reporting.

  7. Shooter says:

    I remember on CNN the mayor of New York said that Sandy, a Category 1 hurricane, was worse than Irene.

  8. David says:

    In 1938 they had a real storm..
    The New England Hurricane of 1938 (or Great New England Hurricane, Yankee Clipper, Long Island Express, or simply the Great Hurricane) … The storm formed near the coast of Africa in September of the 1938 Atlantic hurricane season, becoming a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale before making landfall as a Category 3 hurricane[1] on Long Island on September 21. The hurricane was estimated to have killed between 682 and 800 people,[2] damaged or destroyed over 57,000 homes

    The majority of the storm damage was from storm surge and wind. Damage is estimated at $6 billion (2004 US$),[9] making it among the most costly hurricanes to strike the U.S. mainland. It is estimated that if an identical hurricane struck today it would cause $39.2 billion (2005 USD) in damage.[10]

    Approximately 600 people died in the storm in New England, most in Rhode Island, and up to 100 people elsewhere in the path of the storm.[11] An additional 708 people were reported injured.[12]

    In total, 4,500 cottages, farms, and other homes were reported destroyed. An additional 25,000 homes were damaged. Other damages included 26,000 automobiles destroyed, and 20,000 electrical poles toppled. The hurricane also devastated the forests of the Northeast, knocking down an estimated 2 billion trees in New York and New England.[13] Freshwater flooding was minimal, however, as the quick passage of the storm decreased local rainfall totals, with only a few small areas receiving over 10 inches (250 mm).
    The tide was even higher than usual because of the Autumnal Equinox and full moon. The hurricane produced storm tides of 14 to 18 feet (5 m) across most of the Long Island and Connecticut coast, with 18- to 25-foot (8 m) tides from New London east to Cape Cod. The storm surge was especially violent along the Rhode Island shore, sweeping hundreds of summer cottages out to sea. As the surge drove northward through Narragansett Bay, it was restricted by the Bay’s funnel shape and rose to nearly 16 feet (15.8) feet above normal spring tides, resulting in more than 13 feet (4.0 m) of water in some areas of downtown Providence. Several motorists were drowned in their autos…”

    Wike, under “New York Hurricanes” actually does a pretty good job including one with a recording of 938 millibars.

  9. David says:

    Ben, thanks, that is a great video. The people appear to me made of better stock.

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