Jeff Masters Called Out For Lying About The Typhoon

Before the typhoon made landfall, some international forecasters were estimating wind speeds at 195 m.p.h., which would have meant the storm would hit with winds among the strongest recorded. But local forecasters later disputed those estimates. “Some of the reports of wind speeds were exaggerated,” Mr. Paciente said.

The Philippine weather agency measured winds on the eastern edge of the country at about 150 m.p.h., he said, with some tracking stations recording speeds as low as 100 m.p.h.

A Powerful Typhoon Speeds Across the Philippines – NYTimes.com

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14 Responses to Jeff Masters Called Out For Lying About The Typhoon

  1. omnologos says:

    From climate p*rn to climate (pretend) snuff….

    There is nothing beneath some alarmists.

  2. Stephen Latham says:

    I’m not sure where Jeff Masters mentions ‘lying’. He does say that Haiyan had winds of 190 – 195 mph at landfall, making it the strongest tropical cyclone on record to make landfall in world history. Elsewhere he mentions that previous hurricane speeds in the 40s to 60s may have been overestimated.

  3. Lawrence13 says:

    Yahoo now saying up to a thousand casualties OMG!

  4. Stewart Pid says:

    Children and fisherman exaggerate …. Masters is a liar for a political cause.

  5. Eli Rabett says:

    Not quite clear what your point is. There is no doubt this was a Cat 5 super typhoon and as it approached landfall, the winds were in the 190+ sustained range as viewed from satellites. Whether it was still Cat 5 at landfall is not quite clear yet but it was strong, almost certainly stronger than 140 mph at the riim wall, and again it is not very clear how far away the stations referred to by Mr. Paciente were

    • You are comparing wind speeds at altitude over the open ocean two hours earlier with wind speeds on the ground at landfall.

      Before the typhoon made landfall, some international forecasters were estimating wind speeds at 195 m.p.h., which would have meant the storm would hit with winds among the strongest recorded. But local forecasters later disputed those estimates. “Some of the reports of wind speeds were exaggerated,” Mr. Paciente said.

      The Philippine weather agency measured winds on the eastern edge of the country at about 150 m.p.h., he said, with some tracking stations recording speeds as low as 100 m.p.h.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/09/world/asia/powerful-typhoon-causes-mass-disruption-in-philippines.html?smid=tw-share&_r=0

      Camille had measured ground speeds of 190 MPH – before the wind gauges broke.

  6. Masters is Borg. Borg defend Masters.

  7. kirkmyers says:

    Masters is a worn-out conduit for the AGW bilge. He knows there’s money to made, publicity to be had, and a prized place on the “A list” cocktail party list for any self-serving scientist willing to spread the AGW gospel to the gullible masses. The one thing he’ll never do is admit he was wrong about human-caused global warming. It would burst his inflated ego.

    In the future, look for his name to appear in the thesaurus as a synonym for “charlatanism.”

  8. useful explanation here:

    “………..it would appear that Haiyan/Yolanda passed over the usual very warm waters that allow the formation of typhoons, but also, over water that was warm at depth so as the top of the sea is churned up by the growing storm, there would be extra heat to feed that storm.

    At 100 meters depth, the sea was warm enough to form a typhoon. That, dear reader, is extreme.

    The same thing happened with Katrina. According to a report from NOAA….

    We know that the ocean is absorbing a lot of the extra heat caused by global warming. Well, this is some of that heat, causing megastorms.

    http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2013/11/11/why-was-typhoon-haiyanyolanda-so-powerful-and-is-this-a-trend/#.UoGjHjMfDbU.twitter

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