Five Years Of Permanent Drought In Australia

This drought may never break

January 4, 2008
IT MAY be time to stop describing south-eastern Australia as gripped by drought and instead accept the extreme dry as permanent, one of the nation’s most senior weather experts warned yesterday.

“Perhaps we should call it our new climate,” said the Bureau of Meteorology’s head of climate analysis, David Jones.

This drought may never break – Environment – smh.com.au

Advertisements

About stevengoddard

Just having fun
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to Five Years Of Permanent Drought In Australia

  1. SMS says:

    I was working in South Australia when the drought was broken. We were seeing floods moving down from Queensland to fill the dry lake beds around NE SA. The rains started and washed away the roads and didn’t allow for any work in the gas fields. There were wells we did not get to for years due to the flooding.

    Adelaide was in the process of finishing a very expensive desalinization plant when the rains hit. They built the desal plant based on the best advice they could get from Tim Flannery. If they would have talked to Bob Carter, they could have saved a butt-load of money.

    The reservoirs filled and the desal plant was moth balled. But the desal plant may have some use in the future. As is the cycle, SA will go into drought soon; and because the citizens of SA did not build additional reservoirs to compensate for added usage, the need for water will resurface.

    • Olaf Koenders says:

      Amazing how it always rains after a drought. How anyone could ever listen to Flim-Flam Flannery again is beyond me or science.

  2. gator69 says:

    Prior to the dust bowl, the former chancellor of the University of Kansas encouraged settlement of the lower Great Plains by declaring that the climate there had undergone a ‘permanent shift’.

    http://www.dtnprogressivefarmer.com/dtnag/common/link.do;jsessionid=797BAB7C928F6367CD3CF3DF3C5D50ED.agfreejvm2?symbolicName=/free/news/template1&product=/ag/news/bestofdtnpf&vendorReference=81adb8a8-9bec-43c0-ac3c-07dea59a884d__1352312547266&paneContentId=88&paneParentId=0

  3. Aard Knox says:

    Droughts in Australia are a fact of life. They are mostly caused by a combination of our geography and the effects of El Nino.
    Australian journalists are too lazy to research that and rely on a bunch of so-called climate experts. Governments too rely on the same green gurus and refuse to build more dams as population grows so as not to offend these oracles. This is not confined to one small state. The states with the biggest population growth are the worst offenders.
    Hence, our droughts are also caused by mass stupidity.
    Our education system reinforces mass stupidity so when the present generation of old farts like me dies out we will have permanent drought.

  4. Rosco says:

    2010 saw the return of average rainfalls.

    2011 saw the Queensland floods.

    2012 saw the most rainfall in the Jan – June period since the 1974 floods – just no real intense flooding downpours.

    2013 saw above average rainfall again for the Jan – June period.

    “Perhaps we should call THAT our new climate” LOL !

  5. ntesdorf says:

    Since these statements were issued, it has not stopped raining and raining. Sydney had twice its usual rain this November. The desalination plants installed by panicking governments in Australia’s States are all moth-balled and idle.
    Don’t just sit there, Panic!

  6. Jimbo says:

    Why the desalination plants? Was it so some people could get rich off of contracts?
    http://www.veoliawater.com.au/veoliawater/contracts-projects/queensland-desalination.htm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s