Conflating Nonsense

It is absolutely true that net heat flow is is always from a warmer location to a cooler location.

It is also absolutely true that in order to maintain a constant flow of heat,  an increase in temperature at the colder location has to be accompanied by an increase in temperature at the warmer location.

People who conflate the two principals are an embarrassment to skeptics. Don’t do that.

About stevengoddard

Just having fun
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

17 Responses to Conflating Nonsense

  1. richard says:

    I think that sounds all about right!

    Just do not talk about a body of heat surrounded by a blanket that has no means of cooling. Otherwise you would be comparing that to a tank of water with lagging , as the element inside heats of course the tank would overheat. But add in an in an out for cool water to come in and hotter water to leave you start to have a better version of your atmosphere, of course in the real atmosphere there would be no metal and no lagging.

    • richard says:

      “It is absolutely true that net heat flow is is always from a warmer location to a cooler location” – two rooms, one colder than the other, one room is heated. I open the door, the heat floods in raising the temp of the cooler room.

      “It is also absolutely true that in order to maintain a constant flow of heat, an increase in temperature at the colder location has to be accompanied by an increase in temperature at the warmer location” as the colder room heats the warmer room that has just lost its heat to the colder room will start to warm up until it gets back to the temp it was before the door was opened, it will not get to a hotter temp.

      • richard says:

        as the colder room temp rises, the warmer room that has just lost its heat to the colder room will start to warm up until it gets back to the temp it was before the door was opened, it will not get to a hotter temp.

  2. Timo Soren says:

    Thanks for finally putting ‘constant’ in the statement!

  3. Tim says:

    ABOUT TIME.

  4. nickreality65 says:

    The surface of the earth is the warm system, the troposphere is the cold system. Heat flows from the warm system to the cold system. The warm system gains heat as fast as it loses heat, temperature remains steady. Same with the cold system. All is in balance.
    Along comes an insulator, CO2 and other GHGs. An insulator slows the rate of heat transfer. In order to maintain the heat flow and balance, the surface must get hotter to drive the heat at the original rate through that insulation.
    What’s missing is water vapor’s role as a thermostatic controller. Air absorbs water vapor, increasing its relative humidity, lb water per lb dry air, and associated heat (and lots of it) without increasing its temperature!

    IPCC AR5 TS.6 Key Uncertainties is where climate science “experts” admit what they don’t know about some really important stuff. They are uncertain about the connection between climate change and extreme weather especially drought. Like the 3” drought that hit Phoenix. They are uncertain about how the ice caps and sheets behave. Instead of gone missing they are bigger than ever. They are uncertain about heating in the ocean below 2,000 meters which is 50% of it, but they “wag” that’s where the missing heat of the AGW hiatus went, maybe. They are uncertain about the magnitude of the CO2 feedback loop, which is not surprising since after 17 plus years of rising CO2 and no rising temperatures it’s pretty clear whatever the magnitude, CO2 makes no difference.

    http://www.writerbeat.com/articles/3713-CO2-Feedback-Loop

    Click to access PSI_Miatello_Refutation_GHE.pdf

  5. markstoval says:

    “It is also absolutely true that in order to maintain a constant flow of heat, an increase in temperature at the colder location has to be accompanied by an increase in temperature at the warmer location.”

    As I understand you, if I have a heat source that is producing X amount of heat and that heat is flowing into and object (say a small pond) then as the pond heats up the heat flow will decrease. If I want to keep the heat flow constant then I have to up the amount of heat my machine is producing. If I understand you correctly, then I would agree. I would also point out that depending on the nature of my machine (its capacity) and the size of the pond (the heat sink) I may or may not be able to measure the variations in the 3 items mentioned. (the flow might decrease on me but I would not be able to tell it was doing so as it was too small of a decrease to measure)

    With all that said; and if we agree so far, who is conflating that with your first statement?

  6. stuartlarge says:

    Of course insulation warms, one has only to notice the difference in temperature during a cloudy night compared to a clear sky night, to understand that.
    However that is mostly from water vapor not CO2, water vapor in clouds works both ways reflecting suns heat during the day, and warming at night.
    It is a moderator.

  7. gymnosperm says:

    K, but living in an ice age as we do, it may be a mistake to presume that “geothermal” as we know it has always been this small.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s