Only 100 Degrees Of Warming Needed To Start The Greenland Meltdown

Temperature in Greenland now is -67F, and only needs to warm up 100 degrees to get above freezing.

ScreenHunter_5196 Dec. 14 06.21 summit:status:webcam

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16 Responses to Only 100 Degrees Of Warming Needed To Start The Greenland Meltdown

  1. markstoval says:

    Only a 100 degrees? We are in deep trouble then.

    Al Gore said the earth’s core was millions of degrees hot and we all know that when that heat comes to the surface it gets radiated into the magic molecules in the air that multiplies that heat by 20 fold or more (source may also be Al Gore but I forget now) so we could see a hot time in the old town tonight real soon!

    So there! /snark

    • nielszoo says:

      Yeah, and Greenland’s got all those volcanoes that are erupting more ’cause of frakking in the North Sea and that millions of degree hot lava is getting spewed all over the land and is melting all the ice and it’s never happened before and is all because of your SUV and Mann made CO2.

  2. rah says:

    How are Jeb and his family of climate refugees doing up there these days? https://stevengoddard.wordpress.com/2013/09/25/first-climate-refugees-arrive-in-greenland/

  3. BallBounces says:

    The challenge is much less daunting in celsius.

    • rah says:

      Unless your trying to live or work in it. Then it doesn’t matter what scale anyone tries to use.

      • mjc says:

        Unless it’s this one…
        Cold, too damn cold and don’t even think about going outside…

        • Gail Combs says:

          -30°F (-34°C) = too damn cold.
          At -28°C to -39°C (Windchill) exposed skin can freeze in 10 to 30 minutes.
          -40°C to -47°C (Windchill) exposed skin can freeze in 5 to 10 minutes.
          -48°C to -54°C (Windchill) exposed skin can freeze in 2 to 5 minutes.
          below -55°C (Windchill) exposed skin can freeze in less than 2 minutes.

          Take -30°F (-34°C) and add wind and you are in frostbite city!
          http://www.ec.gc.ca/meteo-weather/default.asp?lang=En&n=5FBF816A-1#table1

        • rah says:

          “don’t even think about going outside…” I’m sure some of us other than Tony and I have lived outside for an extended period when it was at that category. When you have to sleep with your leather Hanwag mountaineering boots under your head to keep them from freezing so solid that you can’t get your feet in them then it’s that cold.

          Sometimes these days as I settle down for a long winters nap in my nice warm comfortable bed during a subzero night I remember that I did that stuff every February for 8 winters and I think to myself “WTF! Were you crazy?” Then I remember there are other guys out there doing it right now and I snuggle down a little lower under the covers with my Lady and and think “Have at it guys. Better you than me.”.

  4. philjourdan says:

    It will – some time in the distant future.

  5. Centinel2012 says:

    Reblogged this on Centinel2012 and commented:
    Only a 100 degrees — not to worry I’m sure they can come up with a way to get there!

    • BallBounces says:

      100 degrees is really just 1 degree and 2 nothings. And, everybody knows 2 nothings cancel out 1 degree. It’s a done deal!

  6. phlogiston says:

    Some new research on the origin of current glaciation 3Mya at the start of the Pleistocene:

    The key role of global solid-Earth processes in preconditioning Greenland’s glaciation since the Pliocene
    Bernhard Steinberger1, Wim Spakman, Peter Japsen and Trond H. Torsvik
    Terra Nova (2015) in press, DOI: 10.1111/ter.12133

    Abstract
    After >500 Myr of absence, major Northern Hemisphere glaciations appeared during the Plio-Pleistocene, with Greenland leading other northern areas. Here we propose that three major solid-Earth processes underpinned build-up of the Greenland ice-sheet. First, a mantle-plume pulse, responsible for the North Atlantic Igneous Province at ~60 Ma, regionally thinned the lithosphere. Younger plume pulses led to uplift, which accelerated at ~5 Ma, lifting the parts of the East Greenland margin closest to Iceland to elevations of more than 3 km above sea level. Second, plate-tectonic reconstruction shows a ~6° northward component of Greenland motion relative to the mantle since ~60 Ma. Third, a concurrent northward rotation of the entire mantle and crust toward the pole, dubbed True Polar Wander (TPW), contributed an additional ~12o change in latitude. These global geodynamic processes preconditioned Greenland to sustain long-term glaciation, emphasizing the role of solid-Earth processes in driving long-term global climatic transitions.

  7. Andy DC says:

    Well interior Greenland did have 2 hours of +2C weather two or three years ago and due to that, the 7,500 foot thick ice sheet all melted (sarc). It’s worse than we thought!

  8. globalcooler says:

    Reblogged this on Globalcooler's Weblog and commented:
    Run for your lives. The floods are coming…

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