Ice-Free Florida Threatened By Global Warming

Think of the alligator pups. Drive your SUV around the block an extra time tonight.

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About stevengoddard

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19 Responses to Ice-Free Florida Threatened By Global Warming

  1. Donna K. Becker says:

    What is the source of this map? And for what time period? Just curious.

    • I think it is a NCEP map for the next couple of weeks.

      • Donna K. Becker says:

        Thanks! And it wouldn’t surprise me. I just wish the PNW and High Plains/Western Mountains would get some of this snow! Even California. Ski resorts are hurting. Is there any hope?

        • Ernest Bush says:

          Last year’s high pressure ridge formed up off the California and Oregon coasts again. It forms a convergence with a huge low pressure area in the Pacific. The result is the Pacific moisture travels north along the convergence and winds up in Canada. In Canada, the moist air rotates clockwise around an even bigger high pressure area and is pushed into the northern states and New England along with Arctic air.

          As long as this pattern holds its bad news for the eastern states and the Midwest. We in the West and Southwest stay warm and sunny. A lot of Bostonians would love to trade places with us right now. They have run out of places to put snow removed from streets and have just received permission from the state to dump it in the ocean.

        • Donna K. Becker says:

          I do understand the basic dynamics you describe. Is there any reasonable chance that this pattern will change this season? I also know that established patterns tend to persist.

  2. gregole says:

    Florida ice free? OMG it’s worse than we thought! /sarc

  3. rah says:

    Hey man I’ve been doing my part! Used 302 gallons of diesel fuel this week so far! And a lot of it where it’s most needed! Freezing rain in Indiana and Ohio going up. Snow in NY. By noon on Tuesday I was down in Chelsea, MA picking up 18 pallets of frozen bakery products. That’s right down there in old Boston on the north side of the harbor east of the Bunker Hill memorial and due north of Logan Airport. In a couple of places I was just creeping along because people were walking in the streets since the sidewalk was covered with 5′ high berms of plowed snow. On my way out I was forced to drive right up Broadway in Chelsea to get to Hwy 16 west because of closed ramps due to the snow. Such a fun place to drive a big truck with the side of your trailer clearing the side mirrors of parked cars by an 1″ or so! But going out I did drive through the big dig for the first time! The 2 1/2 gallons of window washing fluid my truck tank holds did not even get me to Andover for my delivery. Good indication of the conditions I enjoyed going out there.

    I stopped for my break on the way back after a 16+ hour day at the Iroquois service area on I-90 in NY last night (Tuesday). At midnight I was awaken from a sound sleep by banging, scraping, and beeping. It was a front loader loading snow into dump trucks that were hauling the snow out of the service area to clear the parking lot. But the 704 mi I drove to get back from there was a breeze except of some wind along US 30 in Ohio.

    • Gail Combs says:

      Gag, I feel for you.
      I took a pickup and horse trailer down in that area during the summer and thought I would never get out. Some darn fool tried to beat me through a left turn by sneaking up next to my rear pick-up wheels. He ended up caught between an electric pole, the truck, and the trailer and finally he had to back down the sidewalk to get the mess unstuck. I spent ten minutes arguing with the fool trying to convince him the only option was to back up. I finally gave up got back in the truck shut down the engine and started reading a paper back.

      • Ernest Bush says:

        I see that nothing has changed there since the 1960’s except the politics. I was stationed at Hansom Field. People in the Boston area at that time respected the military.

        It was my first experience with rotaries. Also, occasionally I had to wait at a stop light because the person at the front of the line would get out and run into a corner grocery. Sometimes we waited through several light cycles before they came out to drive away.

      • rah says:

        Truck drivers are taught to take control of an intersection. In the event that your required to make a hard right using a “button hook” http://s1.hubimg.com/u/1524540_f260.jpg turn and some bone head has pulled up past the courtesy line not allowing you to swing wide enough the clear you just pull up in front of then and stop with your trailer in the intersection. Don’t make gestures, argue, or blow the horn. Just sit there and look at them. Sooner or later he/she and the vehicles behind realize they and most everyone else at the intersection aren’t going anywhere until they make room one way or another for you to complete the turn. That is the kind of hard ball you have to play when driving a larger vehicle in such places. Those courtesy lines are there for a reason.

  4. markstoval says:

    The SUV thing is working! It is predicted that the temps in Daytona Beach will go from a low of 41 degrees F to 71 degrees F. That is a rise of 30 degrees in just 12 hours or so! At this rate we will be able to melt steel on the streets by the end of the month!

    It is worse than we thought. /sarc

    • ralphcramdo says:

      I’ll try to keep everyone informed if there are still living people here in central Florida after such a dramatic temperature rise. Please pray for the Florida children!

  5. NielsZoo says:

    Ummm, I’m not too sure about that. I’m in East Central Florida and I just got done feeding my equines… my fingers and ears are numb. Is that from global warming?

    • Gail Combs says:

      Niel, I am waiting for the temperature to get above freezing so we can fill the water tanks…

      • NielsZoo says:

        I don’t envy you… frozen valves, rigid rubber hoses that break like glass, split pipes from ice expansion… arrhg. I remember one really nasty winter in the early 80’s trying to keep open water for a small duck colony in a park in St. Louis. My Sgt. and I would go down every morning with a few boxes of 12g slugs and knock the edges back so the park’s crew could “hoe” the ice out in the “puddles” the ducks kept open. Every other winter they could usually keep about a 15′ ice free area in the ponds they hung out in just by swimming around. That year we had problems keeping 6′ of water and actually lost a couple of ducks when they froze all the way in overnight. I do not miss that kind of cold.

        • Gail Combs says:

          Niel When we first came south, before we bought our farm, my horses were at a rodeo barn not far from the trailer park we were camped in. We had a winter like this one and the guys got snowed in out west at a rodeo competition. We ended up taking care of the entire farm and the pipes froze. A real mess.

          After that I put our piping for the farm three foot down. Do not have to worry about frozen pipes or hitting the lines with the post hole digger. All the water hydrants are frost free. So all we have to do is drain the hoses if we know it is going to be below freezing all day.

          Still need heavy rubber gloves and a sledge hammer to clear the tanks of ice though.

          I do not envy EMSnews up on her New York mountain. That area is very pretty but not in this type of weather unless you are a X-country ski nut.

  6. Psalmon says:

    GLs only above 80% ice coverage six times in last 40 years. Above 90% three of those. It’s very rare. 2014 was 91%, hottest year ever. 2015 already at 64% early February and will likely join the 80% club given that bullseye. Over 80% two years in a row…last time 77, 78, 79.

    Climate lunatics used to call the GL’s the “canary in the coal mine.”

  7. S2 says:

    Is it me, or is Michigan taking it on the chin with this one?

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