This Morning’s Asthma Free Walk In 400 PPM CO2

Tom and Becky took me for a lovely walk this morning along the Mississippi River

ScreenHunter_166 May. 22 21.35

In 1988, CO2 was 350 PPM and the Mississippi River was almost dry. James Hansen warned Congress that the droughts would only get worse as CO2 increased.

ScreenHunter_168 May. 22 21.40

This is what the Mississippi River looks like at 400 PPM CO2.

ScreenHunter_167 May. 22 21.38

About stevengoddard

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10 Responses to This Morning’s Asthma Free Walk In 400 PPM CO2

  1. omanuel says:

    Welcome to the home of Tom Sawyer! I live about 200 miles downstream.

    Today Paul Homewood showed how NASA adjusts temperature data:

    https://notalotofpeopleknowthat.wordpress.com/2015/05/22/how-nasa-lie/

    and E. M. Smith reports on the impact of historical climate changes on civilizations:

    https://chiefio.wordpress.com/2015/05/22/more-on-middle-east-drought-cold-and-california-drought/

    NASA and DOE scientists obviously have no idea how serious the consequences may be for their own friends and relatives of lying to the public about solar and nuclear energy.

  2. These climate modellers seem to have no sense of reality and no sense of their ineptitude. Not one of the ‘the models say’ group takes a realistic approach to human life on earth.
    They’ve all factored CO2 effects heavily into their models and not bothered to revisit that assumption based move.revisit

  3. Athelstan. says:

    Where would I be without my CO² – love it, love life, get real.

  4. John Silver says:

    Where is that nice looking bridge?

    • AndyG55 says:

      I dunno, but it looks sort of unfinished.

      The arches are a nice design, sort Sydney Harbour Bridge’ish, elegant,

      but where is the arch on the right?

      • AndyG55 says:

        I do see that the girders underneath are deeper on the right,

        I assume a shorter section leading to the shore.

      • Hernando de Soto Bridge on I-40 in Memphis. Your observation about the section without an arch was right:

        https://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hernando_de_Soto_Bridge

        • rah says:

          BTW Colorado about 3 years ago when passing over that bridge going east a bolt fell off the east end of the east arch and hit my windshield hard enough to crack it severely. Sure got my attention! That was the second time in my driving career that a piece of metal fell from a bridge when I was passing over in a big truck and damaged my windshield. The first time was a washer that hit when I was passing over a bridge in Illinois. How do I know what those pieces of metal were? I saw the bolt and the washer left a perfect mar in the glass showing it’s shape.

  5. We can´t expect reliable predictions when climate scientist are using scientific methods from the renaissance – at best. No close scrutiny, no critical evaluation of the models.

  6. rah says:

    The mighty Mississip has been up a lot of the time since 1988. Crossed it many times over both bridges in Memphis (I-40 and I-55) and further upstream from IL to MO on I-55 and going north of St. Louis on I-270. Several times the River has been up to the levees over those times. Can’t remember barge traffic being restricted due to low water in that time.

    BTW my fireman friend down in Dallas, TX which works their fire and recovery boat on lake Hubbard this time of year said that as of last week they had recovered 4 bodies from the lake. Seems the stronger currents have caused bodies that were dumped with weights to break loose.

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