Something Is Happening, So It Must Be Due To Global Warming

Global warming alarmist needed. Those with critical thinking skills need not apply

Global warming is having a devastating effect on bumblebees and could see them wiped out, scientists have warned.

Unlike other insects the heavyweight bees, which play a vital role in pollination, are not migrating further north in search of cooler places to live as their southern territory heats up.

The study of 67 species shows that over the past 110 years bumblebees have lost about 185 miles from the southern edge of their living space in Europe and North America.

Global warming ‘killing off bees’ because they are not migrating north | Daily Mail Online

If it was due to global warming, the bees would be migrating north. Obviously that is not what is happening.  Perhaps they could have talked to someone who actually knows something about bumblebees?

Bumblebees are being killed by agricultural eradication of wildflowers.

ScreenHunter_2473 Jul. 10 20.02

Why bees need help | Bumblebee Conservation Trust

So the fraudsters simply blame non-existent global warming, and get their day in the sun.

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52 Responses to Something Is Happening, So It Must Be Due To Global Warming

  1. Gail Combs says:

    I am in the south and see temperatures to 100F (38C) I also have white clover and many other flowering ‘weeds’ in my pastures (goat food). My fields are full of bumble bees, honey bees, dragonflies, lady bugs, black wasps….

    The black wasps is rather pretty. I just wish they would stay out of the house. They and the lady bugs love my white doors. I spend a lot of time catching the critters and tossing them outside again.

    • V. Uil says:

      Ah, but your evidence is only anecdotal. Only warmists are allowed to use anecdotal evidence to explain too many/too few insects, storms/lack of storms, heating/cooling and drought/floods.

      The rest of us need peer reviewed evidence even to be considered.

      • Gail Combs says:

        I would be happy to send you one of my pretty black wasps the next time I catch one along with bumblebees and of course some yellow Jackets. I am sure I can also dig up a water moccasin or two.

        Perhaps I can send them to Mikey in Penn so he can peer at them.

        Nasty smile: https://media2.stickersmalin.com/produit/100/stickers-devil-smile-R1-143760-2.png

        • emsnews says:

          I once caught this HUGE rat in NYC. I called the rat control guy in City Hall. He said he didn’t make house calls. So I said, ‘This means I have to bring you the rat?’ He said yes.

          Ahem…I tried to find a cage for the monster rat that weighed in at nearly ten pounds. I wanted very badly to release it in his office.

        • gator69 says:

          Rat control in City Hall? Isn’t that their personnel office?

    • g5cats says:

      I’m not the only one who rescues bugs from my house & porch? And tosses them outside? Lolz!
      This article is absolutely correct: if it was getting warmer? The bees would move further North, not avoiding it. Obviously other factors are involved, but not for the AGW Faithful! There is only One True Answer for them.

    • Justa Joe says:

      That black wasp looks wicked mean.

      Anyway I love how these alarmists imply that the so-called greater warmth is at all perceptible by a living organism without a nice calculator that is.

    • pinroot says:

      Here in the Piedmont area, I don’t see many honey bees but there are plenty of bumble bees, and quite a few yellow jackets around the house. The bumble bees seem to especially like the oregano when it flowers.

  2. gator69 says:

    I have reclaimed monoculture on my property, and I have encouraged native plants to take back that land. As a result I have at least 7 different species of bees, and untold varieties of wasps there. Modern farming practices account for a major portion of our problems when it comes to habitat loss. I have quail coming out of my ears now, where once they were rare, and simply by putting back hedgerows and native plants.

    Grantologists are making a mess of this planet, and science.

    • Gail Combs says:

      My farm was worn out tobacco fields and I also used native plants. I was the only one with grass and I did not have to replant after the NC drought a few years ago. I have tried to make sure my pastures are not monoculture (Kentucky 31 fescue) like everyone else.

      • gator69 says:

        Quail prefer open fields next to native grasses and shrubs, they need cover but not too thick. 50+ years ago farmers left hedgerows of native plants in between fields, and quail thrived, but now farmers prefer to plant fescue in between fileds as it is easier to maintain. Quail pullets cannot negotiate the thick fescue, so for breeding this is a disaster, and habitat is lost.

        • Mom2Kids says:

          Another issue with quail is the fire ant. Fire ants have almost wiped out the native quail population in my neck of the woods.

      • Gail Combs says:

        Gator, I practice intense grazing.

        I have over thirty 30 ft X 300 ft paddocks. The animals are moved in for three to five days and then the inedible weeds (nightshade, buttercup, sickle pod…) are spot sprayed and the paddock is left fallow for 4 to six weeks or more. This allows plants to flower and reseed and provides cover for all sorts of animals. That is why my clover stand is twenty years old instead of having to be reseed every 3 to 5 years.

        • emsnews says:

          I used to have a pair of oxen and two horses but mainly this farm was about sheep farming. Now, that is all gone. When we had free trade 20 years ago the price of my sheep fell from $75-150 a head to less than $50 which means little profit after wintering over the ewes during the long winters here in Upstate NY.

          And yes, we never had to do a thing to the fields to keep them rich eating for the animals the natural mix was just fine! Now we grow mainly deer which we cull each fall and eat.

    • Ernest Bush says:

      Gambels quail coveys began to get scarce on the Arizona desert, but with the milder, wetter summers (relatively speaking) they have been getting larger. They are being spotted closer in around the city of Yuma. Bee populations are also on the increase with more wildflowers blooming.

      If gourds reappear after disappearing during the scorching early 90’s then we are definitely in a cooling period.

      • emsnews says:

        My family lived in Arizona and California since 1848. Tucson since the Gadsden Purchase, and I know the quail well. Cute little guys!

        They thrive where horses and cattle are kept, they eat the seeds from the bales of hay, etc. I used to toss them goodies in the morning when feeding the horses. The quail would sit across the road from the stables and then run in line across the driveway to come to the fence when they heard me call in the horses, etc.

        The roadrunners used to wait for my school bus and cross the road, too. They loved it when I cleaned the swimming pool filter which had bugs and some reptiles. Favorite food for them: SNAKES. Yummy, yummy.

  3. shane says:

    Would acres of solar panels have a negative effect?

    • Gail Combs says:

      Yes because the grass is kept very short (sheep) or all vegitation is poisoned.

    • Robertv says:

      Put some windmills so that the last remaining bees are not eaten by birds.

      • Put solar panels in between the windmills, to keep sun off the grass. Then we can use the electricity from the solar to power the windmills and keep them spinning on windless days.

      • Gail Combs says:

        I rather use sheep than wind turbines. They are edible and their wool will keep me warm. When the dead birds and bats run out the wind turbines are useless.

  4. Eric Simpson says:

    If it was due to global warming, the bees would be migrating north

    Oh, but it’s not due to global warming. It’s due to climate change!
    And Trump:
    “This very expensive GLOBAL WARMING bullshit has got to stop” -Donald Trump
    “Surprise? 1970’s global cooling alarmists were pushing the same no-growth liberal agenda as today’s global warming.” -Donald Trump
    “Obama’s speech on climate change was scary. It will lower our standard of living and raise costs of fuel & food for everyone.” -Donald Trump
    “Gore wants us to clean up our factories and plants in order to protect us from global warming, when China and other countries couldn’t care less. It would make us totally non-competitive in the manufacturing world, and China, Japan and India are laughing at America’s stupidity.” -Donald Trump
    “With the coldest winter ever recorded, with snow setting record levels up and down the coast, the Nobel committee should take the Nobel Prize back from Al Gore.” -Donald Trump
    “The concept of global warming was created by and for the Chinese in order to make U.S. manufacturing non-competitive.” -Donald Trump

    • AndyG55 says:

      “The concept of global warming was created by and for the Chinese in order to make U.S. manufacturing non-competitive”

      And guess where Maurice Strong lives now !

      • Robertv says:

        Maurice F. Strong, PC CC OM FRSC FRS (born April 29, 1929 in Oak Lake, Manitoba) is a Canadian businessman specialising in oil and mineral resources,

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurice_Strong

        86 years old

        Henry Alfred Kissinger (/ˈkɪsɪndʒər/;[1] born Heinz Alfred Kissinger [haɪnts ˈalfʁɛt ˈkɪsɪŋɐ]; May 27, 1923) is an American diplomat and political scientist.

        92 years old

        Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; born 21 April 1926[a]) is the Queen of 16 of the 53 member states in the Commonwealth of Nations. She is Head of the Commonwealth and Supreme Governor of the Church of England.

        89 years old

        Must be the food

    • Hugh says:

      no-growth liberal agenda

      It is not ‘liberal’. A liberal would allow growth. It is an extreme leftist agenda.

      • gator69 says:

        +10000

      • Gail Combs says:

        Neo-Malthusian Luddites?

        And just for the chuckle from Mother Jones: Yes, the Luddites Were Wrong. But So Was Thomas Malthus

        //// So if the steam-powered Luddites were wrong then, why should we listen to the shiny new digital Luddites today?

        This is obviously an appealing argument, but I happen to think it shows a serious lack of imagination. Smart machines won’t simply replace some parts of work, they’ll eventually replace all parts of work.
        ….After all, as Bessen says, the Luddites were wrong. Karl Marx was wrong. A lot of smart people were wrong about the Industrial Revolution. I’m arguing that this time it’s different, but usually that isn’t the case.

        True enough. But let me offer another story along these lines. It’s the story of Thomas Malthus.

        You remember Malthus? In 1798 he predicted doom and gloom for the human race. Population grows geometrically, which means that any gains in productivity are soon swamped. If we produce more food, this simply encourages us to have more children, and more of those children survive to adulthood. This drives down wages and living standards to their old level, world without end. Permanent progress is impossible.

        Today, Malthus has about the same reputation as the Luddites. But don’t let that fool you: he was a brilliant economist, and he was right…..

        So Neo-Malthusian Luddites seems the correct description.

        The non technical crowd do not understand technology and are therefore AFRAID of it.

  5. Gail Combs says:

    This is on the topic of who is winning or losing the battle:

    When the End[ing] of [Western] Human Civilization Is Your Day Job

    Among many climate scientists, gloom has set in. Things are worse than we think, but they can’t really talk about it.

    ….Among climate activists, gloom is building. Jim Driscoll of the National Institute for Peer Support just finished a study of a group of longtime activists whose most frequently reported feeling was sadness, followed by fear and anger. Dr. Lise Van Susteren, a practicing psychiatrist and graduate of Al Gore’s Inconvenient Truth slide-show training, calls this “pretraumatic” stress. “So many of us are exhibiting all the signs and symptoms of posttraumatic disorder—the anger, the panic, the obsessive intrusive thoughts.” …
    Most of the dozens of scientists and activists I spoke to date the rise of the melancholy mood to the failure of the 2009 climate conference and the gradual shift from hope of prevention to plans for adaptation: Bill McKibben’s book Eaarth is
    a manual for survival on an earth so different he doesn’t think we should even spell it the same, and James Lovelock delivers the same message in A Rough Ride to the Future. In Australia, Clive Hamilton writes articles and books with titles like Requiem for a Species…
    INSERT LINK: We recommend: James Cameron On The Dread and Despair That Fuels Climate Change Deniers

    And good old Mikey crying in his beer:

    ….No one has experienced that hostility more vividly than Michael Mann, who was a young Ph.D. researcher when he helped come up with the historical data that came to be known as the hockey stick—the most incendiary display graph in human history, with its temperature and emissions lines going straight up at the end like the blade of a hockey stick. He was investigated, was denounced in Congress, got death threats, was accused of fraud, received white powder in the mail, and got thousands of e-mails with suggestions like, You should be “shot, quartered, and fed to the pigs along with your whole damn families.” Conservative legal foundations pressured his university, a British journalist suggested the electric chair…

    Snivel, sniff, All I wanted to do was collapse the USA and Europe and make gobs of money by lying, sniff, sniff Why does everyone Hate me? waaahhhhh

    • Hugh says:

      he helped come up with the historical data

      Which data was totally high-quality with no cherry-picking or statistical mishandling? Poor doctor Mann, all he wanted was politics and all he got was bucketfuls of politics poured on him.

    • rah says:

      I still say they’re transitioning through the stages of death and dying.

      Denial — One of the first reactions is denial, wherein the survivor imagines a false, preferable reality.
      Anger — When the individual recognizes that denial cannot continue, it becomes frustrated, especially at proximate individuals. Certain psychological responses of a person undergoing this phase would be: “Why me? It’s not fair!”; “How can this happen to me?”; ‘”Who is to blame?”; “Why would God let this happen?”.
      Bargaining — The third stage involves the hope that the individual can avoid a cause of grief. Usually, the negotiation for an extended life is made with a higher power in exchange for a reformed lifestyle. Other times, they will use anything valuable against another human agency to extend or prolong the life. People facing less serious trauma can bargain or seek compromise.
      Depression — “I’m so sad, why bother with anything?”; “I’m going to die soon so what’s the point?”; “I miss my loved one, why go on?”
      During the fourth stage, the individual becomes saddened by the certainty of death. In this state, the individual may become silent, refuse visitors and spend much of the time mournful and sullen.
      Acceptance — “It’s going to be okay.”; “I can’t fight it, I may as well prepare for it.”
      In this last stage, individuals embrace mortality or inevitable future, or that of a loved one, or other tragic event. People dying may precede the survivors in this state, which typically comes with a calm, retrospective view for the individual, and a stable condition of emotions.

    • Robertv says:

      We (The People) are winning every battle but are losing the war because it was never about climate but about fundamentally change the world.

    • Robertv says:

      Night is coming.

    • shazaam says:

      Wait a dog-gone minute.

      Jim Driscoll of the National Institute for Peer Support

      Is that the group of cronies who approve each other’s fear-mongering “peer-reviewed” publications????

  6. emsnews says:

    Maybe they will all drink their Koolaid and thus cease bothering the rest of us?

  7. rah says:

    I have noticed a decline around here in central Indiana in both honey bees and bumble bees. Yet the crops and flowers and weeds all seem to be getting pollinated just fine. All the normal species of wasps seem to be doing fine.

    For some reason there seems to have been an increase in wood boring carpenter bees which look like bumble bees but are darker. I’ve been fighting the darn things the last two summers. They really go after exposed wood surfaces and seem to prefer lumber, even older treated lumber, to the fire wood I have stacked in the yard.

    • Gail Combs says:

      Nothing like finding your post hole digger and shovel have 1/4 inch holes bored all the way through the handle. And your wheeI barrow handle, and rake handle and hoe handle…. I hate the darn things.

      • rah says:

        I’ve never been stung by one of those bees. But they sure do buzz you when you get close to their hole where they have a larvae growing. I spray them and then run a wire in the hole to kill the larvae and plug the hole with wood putty.

  8. D. Self says:

    The bumbles are just fine. The live across multiple temps zones where the ave temp can vary 14 or more deg. i.e Alabama to Michigan. These crooks know that most people don’t realize this.

  9. gator69 says:

    A team of scientists who recently dropped a camera into an underwater volcano off the Solomon Islands made an unanticipated discovery when they reviewed the footage.

    “You never know what you’re going to find. Especially when you are working deep underwater. The deeper you go, the stranger it gets,” ocean engineer Brennan Phillips said in a statement.

    So what exactly did the team discovery? Sharks. Multiple sharks living inside the underwater volcano, seemingly not affected by the hostile conditions which include high temperatures and acidity.

    http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2015/07/10/scientists-drop-camera-in-underwater-volcano-as-they-review-footage-they-cant-believe-their-eyes/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Firewire&utm_campaign=FireWire%20-%20HORIZON%207-11-15%20FINAL

    More unsettling science.

  10. smamarver says:

    Climate is getting strager and stranger. From floods in some parts of the world, to extremely high temperatures in Europe and in other parts of the world.But, no matter how the weather is, and how climate evolves, human beings, animals, plants are all affected. I admit that the behavior of some animals can be changed by the climate change, but still, if the animals change their ways, could be just evolution. Animals changed habits even before human intervention on climate. Global warming started way back, around 150 years ago, when human intervention was minimal. Earh has a cycle of warmer and cooler periods. Now we are in a period with higher temperatures. If you want to find more statistics about climate change please visit http://www.1ocean-1climate.com.

  11. omanuel says:

    “Sans Sanity” for Maurice F. Strong, Henry Alfred Kissinger, Elizabeth II and David Rockefeller

    This is the last line from Jaques famous ‘all the world’s a stage’ speech in Shakespeare’s As You Like It, 1600:

    JAQUES:
    All the world’s a stage,
    And all the men and women merely players:
    They have their exits and their entrances;
    And one man in his time plays many parts,
    His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,
    Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms.
    And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel
    And shining morning face, creeping like snail
    Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
    Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
    Made to his mistress’ eyebrow. Then a soldier,
    Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
    Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,
    Seeking the bubble reputation
    Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then the justice,
    In fair round belly with good capon lined,
    With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
    Full of wise saws and modern instances;
    And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
    Into the lean and slipper’d pantaloon,
    With spectacles on nose and pouch on side,
    His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide
    For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
    Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
    And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
    That ends this strange eventful history,
    Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
    Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

    • Robertv says:

      The biggest problem with these people in power is that they all think that there are to many We The People on this Earth certainly now they don’t need them anymore to fight wars or create wealth.

  12. bit chilly says:

    this is why i keep a large patch of wild flowers (weeds as my lovely wife likes t call them 🙂 ) in my garden every year. if everyone did the same the bee numbers would increase. as steve says, it is not rocket science.

    • gator69 says:

      My reclaimed farm acreage literally hums and buzzes from Spring to Fall, as the different species of native wildflowers keep blossoms available for the many varieties of bees I have (at least seven that I have identified). This time of year my hummingbird population starts to explode, and I go through over a gallon of nectar per day.

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