Climate Change A Boon For Bloodsucking Journalists

ScreenHunter_3140 Sep. 21 16.42

These Giant Arctic Bloodsuckers Are Thriving On Global Warming | TIME

The Arctic has always had giant swarms of mosquitoes. The pictures below were scientists in Siberia circa 1910 searching for the Tunguska meteor. They had to say in mosquito netting 24×7 to stay alive.

ScreenHunter_18 Feb. 17 06.53ScreenHunter_17 Feb. 17 06.53

Magazines like Time lie about the climate constantly, and have been doing it throughout their existence.

ScreenHunter_3142 Sep. 21 16.47 These Giant Arctic Bloodsuckers Are Thriving On Global Warming | TIME

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18 Responses to Climate Change A Boon For Bloodsucking Journalists

  1. Andy DC says:

    The alarmists are the true deniers. They have even gone so far gone to deny there was an Ice Age scare in the 1970’s, even though it is very well documented, as you have illustrated.

    They also deny that 1977, 1978 and 1979 were the three coldest consecutive winters on record over most of the US, also quite cold over the rest of the world as well. But then they have the utter nerve to start most of their charts in 1979, at the end of the unusual cold period, the one they denied had ever happened.

    • AndyG55 says:

      Don Easterbrook did a study on Mt Baker glaciers.

      http://wattsupwiththat.com/2015/09/13/mt-baker-glaciers-disappearing-a-response-to-the-seattle-times/

      The graphs all show very clearly why the climate scammers want to start everything in the late 1970’s.

      And why so much effort has gone into adjusting away the warm period of the 1940’s

    • Jason Calley says:

      Hey Andy! “They have even gone so far gone to deny there was an Ice Age scare in the 1970’s, even though it is very well documented, as you have illustrated.”

      Heck, I remember it! I have actually had a few people tell me that the Ice Age scare never happened. They have been people who were not even born then. I remember it happening — but they tell me I am wrong!

      • gregole says:

        There was an ice-age scare. I was there, I was interested in science (been an engineer since 1979) and I followed it keenly. https://stevengoddard.wordpress.com/1970s-ice-age-scare/#comment-256045

        No ice-age materialized and when it switched to warming in the late ’80s I just ignored it realizing it was the same blabbering idiots all over. Took Climategate in 2009 to get me interested again. And, it was worse than I thought.

        I am still flabbergasted at the lousy media coverage of climate so-called science. Here we have the greatest scientific fraud in history; largest in both scale and scope, and our media is either complicit , or purposely ignoring reporting on newsworthy stories. Shame on them.

        • Gail Combs says:

          I certainly remember it. I was taking geology courses right in the middle of the scare so it was kinda hard to ignore.

      • Elaine Supkis says:

        I was in the middle of the big glaciation winters back then! We were BURIED in deep snow, constant ice, bitter cold winds, etc. I was rebuilding a brownstone with hardly any money due to banks not loaning money except at 12% plus interest rates back then.

        It was hellish, to put it mildly. Had to go onto my brownstone roof regularly to shovel off mountains of snow. Neighbors had their roofs collapse during those three winters.

    • rah says:

      Don’t worry Andy their scam will end before too many years. Unfortunately for us it be a cold ass end to it.

  2. Eric Simpson says:

    Furthermore, mosquitoes use CO2 from our exhalations to hone in on us. Higher levels of CO2 will serve to reduce their ability to find their innocent targets.

  3. omanuel says:

    The integrity of journalism, education, organized religion and science were all destroyed by tyrants’ fear of the WWII discovery that the source of energy in atomic bombs is the source of energy the Sun used to make every atom and to control every life and planet in the solar system today.

    “Scientifically qualified, knowledgeable” persons can verify for themselves that post-WWII physics became a tool to frighten and control the public after atomic bombs revealed the source of solar energy:

    Two falsehoods, inserted into the foundations of solar and nuclear physics, are still obvious for any serious physicist to verify or deny today:

    I. False changes were made in the internal composition of the Sun from:

    _ a.) Mostly iron (Fe) in 1945 to

    _ b.) Mostly hydrogen (H) in 1946 . . .

    with no discussion or debate.

    II. False changes were made in the definition of nuclear stability from:

    _ c.) Minimum value of Aston’s nuclear packing fraction before WWII to

    _ d.) Maximum value of Weizsacker’s nuclear binding energy per nucleon after WWII . . .

    to obscure neutron repulsion and exaggerate proton repulsion in nuclei.

    These lies immediately destroyed the integrity of solar and nuclear physics after nations and national academies of sciences united on October 24, 1945.

    These same falsehoods have now destroyed the integrity of astronomy, astro-physics, climatology, cosmology, particle, planetary and theoretical physics.

    This information is documented on ResearchGate, Public Dropbox & BritiusWordpress for comment and discussion. See Stalin’s Science.”

    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/10640850/STALINS_SCIENCE.pdf

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/281017812_STALIN'S_SCIENCE

  4. Moors710 says:

    I ran into mosquitoes like that before. In the 1970’s in Central Minnesota when I was draining small soggy spots into larger sloughs (where I hunted ducks so I wanted permanent water) we ran into a place with so many mosquitoes that we were choking on them. We returned with netting so we could finish the job. There are times and places when this happens. Warning that global warming will cause this is somewhat misleading,whatever the temperature distribution (short of an iceball) Earth will always have some places like that.

  5. Elaine Supkis says:

    Global warming makes things dryer in places like Alaska. When you have permafrost, you get surface melting that doesn’t go into the ground and this leads to huge mosquito infestations. When the permafrost is gone, there is little standing water in these same places.

  6. Tom says:

    I walked into an insane swarm of attacking mosquitoes in Alaska in 1993. It is an anecdotal single testimonial but it sure was memorable.

    • rah says:

      Yes they do overwhelm one don’t they? And as for the fly issue? Why the hell do people think the caribou go stand in the water during the summer? It’s only place they can get relief from the bugs!

      Fact is the mosquitoes are like most other living things in Alaska. They gotta make hay while the sun shines because when it isn’t shinning anymore it’s over for the season.

  7. Gail Combs says:

    I am lucky. We are on a hill and we have no mosquitoes! No Little Black flies either.

    • Snowleopard says:

      I am also on a hill, some maps call it a mountain, but that is exaggeration. In my case that originally meant I had half the swarms of mosquitoes and black flies those folks below me dealt with.

      But then I got lucky. I started feeding the birds.

      The feeder birds reduced the pests some but their presence attracted flycatchers and phoebes and that really helped. They now return every year. Scarlet tanagers now show up just as the mosquitoes hatch and leave when pickings get slim. Lately I rarely have a black fly or mosquito problem for more than a day or two before the birds, bats, and dragonflies,(with some help from frogs, tree frogs,and toads) take care of it for me. Can’t recall where I put my bug jacket or headnet, ’cause I haven’t used them in years.

      • Gail Combs says:

        I don’t feed the birds, but then I do not have to since there is plenty of ‘wild feed’ (The crows just eat with the goats.)

        We have a very fine crop of dragon flies, praying mantis and lady bugs as well as bats and birds. The black wasps have been really swarming lately.


        The females feed on nectar but feed their young bugs, “most commonly grasshoppers, locusts, cicadas and other large, “fleshy” insects” Luckily they are not aggressive at all.

        And then there is this mention this mother

        Biggest dang spiders I have ever seen! We also have plenty of black widows. You had better be wearing gloves when you pick up anything laying out side because I guarantee there is a black widow lurking underneath. (I hate spiders.)

  8. Robertv says:

    Specialists in infectious disease are protesting a gigantic overnight increase in the price of a 62-year-old drug that is the standard of care for treating a life-threatening parasitic infection.

    The drug, called Daraprim, was acquired in August by Turing Pharmaceuticals, a start-up run by a former hedge fund manager. Turing immediately raised the price to $750 a tablet from $13.50, bringing the annual cost of treatment for some patients to hundreds of thousands of dollars.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/21/business/a-huge-overnight-increase-in-a-drugs-price-raises-protests.html?_r=0

    Pyrimethamine (trade name Daraprim) is a medication used for protozoal infections. It is commonly used as an ANTIMALARIAL drug (for both treatment and prevention of malaria), and to treat Toxoplasma gondii infections, particularly when combined with the sulfonamide antibiotic sulfadiazine when treating HIV-positive individuals.

    It is on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines, the most important medications needed in a basic health system.[1]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrimethamine

  9. rah says:

    To heck with the flies, mosquitoes, and spiders. This year on the 4 acres surrounding mine we have THREE hornets nests. One of them is good sized being wider than a basketball and about twice as long as the diameter. The other two are about the size of a soccer ball. All are still active. Amazing how tough they are to see in the trees. None of us had noticed the largest one that’s up in an old plum tree until just last week. The first one we noticed weeks ago is attached to a corner of my neighbors garage. The other is hanging on one of the lower branches of a medium small silver maple tree that stands maybe 25′ from the picnic shelter my neighbor put up this summer.

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