Endless Environmental Destruction By “Green Californians”

Californians are by far the biggest threat to the environment in the US. They moved to a place which is normally in extreme drought, sucked the water dry and stole it from all the other states.

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 California’s current drought is being billed as the driest period in the state’s recorded rainfall history. But scientists who study the West’s long-term climate patterns say the state has been parched for much longer stretches before that 163-year historical period began.

 And they worry that the “megadroughts” typical of California’s earlier history could come again

Stine, who has spent decades studying tree stumps in Mono Lake, Tenaya Lake, the Walker River and other parts of the Sierra Nevada, said that the past century has been among the wettest of the last 7,000 years.

The longest droughts of the 20th century, what Californians think of as severe, occurred from 1987 to 1992 and from 1928 to 1934. Both, Stine said, are minor compared to the ancient droughts of 850 to 1090 and 1140 to 1320.

Californians demand for electricity made the air I breathed as a child filthy. There were many days when I could barely see the Sangre de Cristo Mountains.

And then in their quest for more water and green electricity, they destroyed one of the most beautiful wildernesses on the planet at Glen Canyon.

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Now they are killing millions of birds with their “green” windfarms.

California is a cancer on the environment.

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38 Responses to Endless Environmental Destruction By “Green Californians”

  1. Oliver Manuel says:

    The futility of UN’s efforts to rule the world by isolating mankind from reality (truth/God) is illustrated in a one-page sequel to Climategate:

    This one-page sequel to the AGW debate shows how government science diverged from reality in 1945 and emerged sixty-four years later as Climategate.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/273132711_Sequel_to_Climategate?showFulltext=1&linkId=54f8a2ba0cf210398e96c66f

  2. omanuel says:

    The ultimate futility of UN’s efforts to rule the world by isolating mankind from reality (truth/God) is illustrated in a one-page sequel to Climategate:

    This one-page sequel to the AGW debate shows how government science diverged from reality in 1945 and emerged sixty-four years later as Climategate.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/273132711_Sequel_to_Climategate?showFulltext=1&linkId=54f8a2ba0cf210398e96c66f

    • omanuel says:

      The Solar System is but a microcosm of the benevolent universe that Joseph Stalin and worldwide associates in National Academies of Sciences hid from the public after WWII:

      https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/10640850/Solar_Energy_For_Review.pdf

      The universe consists of two forms of one fundamental particle:
      _ a.) The compacted neutron (n), and
      _ b.) The expanded hydrogen atom (H)
      _ c.) Vitalized by reversible conversion
      _ d.) Energy => mass; mass => Energy
      _ e.) The universe collapses; expands
      _ f.) Entropy decreases and increases

      God and reality are synonyms for the infinite, benevolent universe that sustains our lives.

      Post-WWII physics championed by Stalin and NAS associates is 99.9% junk science.

    • omanuel says:

      This second, one-page sequel shows Climategate is the tip of a giant, 70-year old iceberg of government deception intended to save the world from possible nuclear annihilation.

      The 1945 decision to hide the source of energy that destroyed Hiroshima has isolated mankind from the Benevolent Universe that sustains our lives.

      https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/10640850/God.pdf

  3. rah says:

    And then of course there was the state mandated fuel additive MTBE (Methyl tert-butyl ether) that contaminated the ground water and aquifers. The state pushed through it’s mandatory use before adequate studies could be done when even the EPA was warning it may be a carcinagen that could contaminate ground water. And to make matters worse, even after the stuff started showing up in measurable amounts in the water they fought and delayed.

  4. emsnews says:

    My grandfather who was born there in the late 19th century and whose family lived there for generations, used to bitterly complain about all the people pouring in during the 1950’s. The smog in Pasadena was horrible back then.

    ‘I wish they would all go home, they are destroying the place!’ he would grumble when the pollution got really bad. This was BEFORE all the freeways were built! When he died, the city of Pasadena illegally demolished his 80 year old home and private observatory and also illegally destroyed my godmother’s home, and turned them into a PARKING LOT.

    Mrs. Mitchner was a prominent Audubon Society founding member who wrote books about birds and her house was a bird haven filled with trees and exotic plants brought back from Japan right after the Civil War.

    The city was sued by my and her heirs and we won and the city supervisor who did this quite maliciously went to prison.

  5. Edmonton Al says:

    Absolutely everything the “Greens-et-al” want us to do to prevent environmental disaster is the EXACT opposite of what should be done.
    History bears this out in “spades”.

    • nigelf says:

      Indeed. Today’s environmentalists are a cancer on the environment.

      • Gail Combs says:

        That is why I call them Eco-nuts and call myself a conservationist.

        The word environmentalist now carries the nasty stench of decaying bird and bat bodies.

        • rah says:

          The word “environmentalist” conjures up an image of a pasty faced city slicker that never once in their life spent a day and night alone in a wilderness, let alone tried to survive and extended time in one, and yet preaches about the environment, and saving habitat, and every damned thing else.

  6. tabnumlock says:

    This explains why there were hardly any Indians there. If the dry conditions continue, the Mexicans may be driven out as the gringo built and maintained water infrastructure collapses.

  7. gator69 says:

    And because of calcification of the rock and sedimentation, even if they drained Glen Canyon, it will never be the same.

    Why not cut down the Redwoods for a wind farm?

  8. kamas716 says:

    The road to hell is paved with good intentions. Seems the dominate philosophy in CA is ‘good intentions’.

  9. Bob Knows says:

    It is true that the biggest and perhaps ONLY environmental problem is the massive over breeding and resulting hunger of 7 billion people (and rapidly growing). It would also appear from the graph that the only time CA gets watered is during unusually warm cycles. They should be promoting global warming to get more rain.

  10. David A says:

    The problem is not population. It is ignorant population and government, There is adequate land and water resources. There is in-adequate government.

  11. Russ Steele says:

    Reblogged this on Sierra Foothill Commentary and commented:
    Heads up Nevada County. The greens are destroying the state!

  12. Psalmon says:

    All the news stories (LA Times, etc.) about CA running out of water ignore the fact that according to CDEC, CA reservoirs have nearly half a million acre feet MORE water now than at this time last year. Still behind, but shades of the “death spiral” narrative.

  13. Kenneth Simmons says:

    I find it hard to feel sorry for a state that boarders the Pacific Ocean screaming about no water. They need to invest in processing sea water into drinkable water, instead of sitting on their hands-no water-really?

    • Adam Gallon says:

      Then watch the same happen as did in Australia? Build desalination plant, instant end to drought!

    • Anthony S says:

      The prospect of cheap desalination in the 70’s caused the cancellation of the statewide water redistribution scheme to put a dozen dams in northern California to divert massive amounts of water southward.

    • Ernest Bush says:

      There were experiments in the 70’s and 80’s to do large scale desalination of the Colorado River in Yuma. It was supposed to drop the amount of salts in the river. The plant never worked right over any period of time and is a large chunk of unused machinery just outside of Yuma, AZ. It has costed taxpayers $250,000 million so far. Start up costs will require a large amount of repairs to the structure.

    • Robertv says:

      Lewis Hamilton was joined on the podium by Arnold Schwarzenegger after securing victory in the Australian Grand Prix – and joked about the Terminator star’s height.

      The 30-year-old Mercedes driver led from start to finish in a race which saw just 11 cars reach the finish line.

      And he was pleasantly surprised to be greeted and congratulated afterwards by the former bodybuilder.

      “I was just asked to conduct the interviews with the winners here. I’m so excited about it,” said Schwarzenegger.

      http://www.mirror.co.uk/sport/formula-1/watch-lewis-hamilton-give-arnold-5337965

      • Anthony S says:

        Since you mentioned F1, last year, under pressure by greens, the F1 cars became hybrids, and allowable fuel consumption was dramatically curtailed. The hybrid systems made engine development more expensive. In order to keep costs down, teams were only given three testing sessions in the off season, which led to unreliable cars in the first race of the season. This is part of the reason only 11 of 20 entries finished

        • stewartpid says:

          For what it is worth the KERS system showed up in 2009 … this is a messy article but u get the basics: Formula One has stated that they support responsible solutions to the world’s environmental challenges,[7] and the FIA allowed the use of 60 kW (82 PS; 80 bhp) KERS in the regulations for the 2009 Formula One season.[8] Teams began testing systems in 2008: energy can either be stored as mechanical energy (as in a flywheel) or as electrical energy (as in a battery or supercapacitor). Raikkönen took the lead of the 2009 Belgian Grand Prix with a KERS-aided overtake and subsequently won the race.
          With the introduction of KERS in the 2009 season, only four teams used it at some point in the season: Ferrari, Renault, BMW and McLaren. Eventually, during the season, Renault and BMW stopped using the system. Vodafone McLaren Mercedes became the first team to win a F1 GP using a KERS equipped car when Lewis Hamilton won the Hungarian Grand Prix on July 26, 2009. Their second KERS equipped car finished fifth. At the following race, Lewis Hamilton became the first driver to take pole position with a KERS car, his team mate, Heikki Kovalainen qualifying second. This was also the first instance of an all KERS front row. On August 30, 2009, Kimi Räikkönen won the Belgian Grand Prix with his KERS equipped Ferrari. It was the first time that KERS contributed directly to a race victory, with second placed Giancarlo Fisichella claiming “Actually, I was quicker than Kimi. He only took me because of KERS at the beginning”.[10]

          Although KERS was still legal in F1 in the 2010 season, all the teams had agreed not to use it.[11] New rules for the 2011 F1 season which raised the minimum weight limit of the car and driver by 20 kg to 640 kg,[12] along with the FOTA teams agreeing to the use of KERS devices once more, meant that KERS returned for the 2011 season.[13] Use of KERS was still optional as in the 2009 season; and at the start of the 2011 season three teams elected not to use it.[14]

          As of 2014, the power capacity of the KERS units will increase from 60 kilowatts (80 bhp) to 120 kilowatts (160 bhp). This will be to balance the sport’s move from 2.4 litre V8 engines to 1.6 litre V6 engines.[16]

  14. JN says:

    You ought to add a label at that tiny red blob on the far right. “Mann-made global warming” would explain to everyone how devastating and unprecedented the California drought is! 🙂

  15. gymnosperm says:

    Easy now, its not just Californians.
    This from Cook et al 2007 is based on a more sophisticated index than just tree rings. It shows that the MWP drought was broken by a significant period of above average rain.

    We Californians just carry on the Anasazi tradition.

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